Glanum

At the heart of the magnificent Alpilles mountains in Provence (southern France), lies the impressive archaeological site of Glanum which features the remains of important religious and civic monuments.

Coordinates: 43° 46′ 26″ N, 4° 49′ 57″ E

Glanum

Originally a simple Gaulish settlement built by the Salluvii around a sacred spring in the 6th century BC, the city later expanded due to contact with the ancient Greeks. This resulted to the extension of the residential area and the construction of buildings in the Hellenistic style. In the Roman period, Glanum benefited from the construction of the Via Domitia and became a Roman colony in the early years of Augustus’ reign (27 BC-14 AD). Today, Glanum is particularly known for two well-preserved Roman monuments of the first century BC, known locally as “les antiques”: a mausoleum (one of the best-preserved monuments from the ancient world) and a triumphal arch (one of the earliest built in France). The ruins of the residential area sit in a narrow valley sloping up from the north to the higher southern end. At the northern end was the residential quarter, with the public baths, and at the southern end, was the sacred quarter, with the spring and grotto. In the centre was the monumental quarter, the site of the forum and public buildings.

Portfolio

The Triumphal Arch of Glanum, built around 10-25 BC, Glanum
The Triumphal Arch of Glanum stood just outside the northern gate of the city and was the visible symbol of Roman power and authority. It was built between 10 and 25 AD. The sculptures decorating the arch illustrated both the civilization of Rome and the dire fate of her enemies.
The Mausoleum of the Julii and Triumphal Arch.
The Mausoleum of the Julii dating to about 40 BC and the Triumphal Arch.
The Mausoleum of the Julii, dating to about 40 BC. It is one of the best preserved mausoleums of the Roman era.
The Mausoleum of the Julii, dating to about 40 BC. It is one of the best preserved mausoleums of the Roman era.
The lowest part of the mausoleum is decorated with carved garlands of vegetation, theater masks and cupids or putti, and with mythical or legendary scenes.
The lowest part of the mausoleum is decorated with carved garlands of vegetation, theater masks and cupids, and with mythical or legendary scenes.
The lowest part of the mausoleum is decorated with carved garlands of vegetation, theater masks and cupids, and with mythical or legendary scenes.
The lowest part of the mausoleum is decorated with carved garlands of vegetation, theater masks and cupids, and with mythical or legendary scenes.
The House of the Antae, a Hellenistic-style residence with a peristyle of Tuscan columns and a basin to capture rainwater, Glanum
The House of the Antae, a Hellenistic-style residence with a peristyle of Tuscan columns and a basin to capture rainwater.
The Thermal Baths built around 75 BC and the House of the Antae in the background.
The Thermal Baths built around 75 BC and the House of the Antae in the background.
Overview of Glanum.
Overview of Glanum.
One of the geminated temples which opened onto the forum.
One of the geminated temples that were identical in style and which opened onto the forum. They were both built in the early years of the reign of the Emperor Augustus.
Overview of the Twin Temples and the Forum.
Overview of the Twin Temples and the Forum.
Overview of Glanum.
Overview of Glanum with the Curia on the right. The Curia was used as an assembly hall for local officials.
The Hellenistic Bouleteurion with the partially reconstructed temple in the background.
The Hellenistic Bouleteurion with the partially reconstructed temple in the background.
The Temple of Valetudo, dedicated to Valetudo, the Roman goddess of health, the inscription indicates that it was built by Agrippa, the future son-in-law of the Emperor Augustus.
The Temple of Valetudo, dedicated to Valetudo, the Roman goddess of health. The inscription indicates that it was built by Agrippa, the future son-in-law of the Emperor Augustus.
The shrine devoted to Hercules, the guardian of springs, and six altars to Hercules, 2nd century AD.
The shrine devoted to Hercules, the guardian of springs, and six altars to Hercules, 2nd century AD.
Overview of the Valley of the Sacred Spring.
Overview of the Valley of the Sacred Spring.

See more images of Glanum on Flickr

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