Minturnae

The Archaeological Area of Minturnae (Comprensorio Archeologico di Minturnae) is a little-known but impressive archaeological site along the Appian Way. It is located in the town of Minturno in the southern Lazio, about 160 kilometers south of Rome and 75 kilometres north of Naples.

Coordinates: 41° 14′ 31.7″ N, 13° 46′ 5.38″ E

Minturno

Minturnae was originally an Auruncian city (of which no archaeological traces have been found), one of the three towns of the Aurunci which allied themselves with the Samnites and made war against Rome in 314 BC. After being defeated by Rome the city suffered severe repression and was burned to the ground. The Romans settled in the area and built a castrum along the river Liris after realising the strategic and commercial importance of its close location to the sea. The military settlement grew into a Roman colony in 296 BC and became an important trading port of the Mediterranean as well as a fortified commercial centre along the Appian Way.

In the 1st century BC Minturnae was a flourishing city provided with a Capitolium (temple dedicated to the triad of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva), a forum and a theatre. During the Imperial era a new forum was built, surrounded by public buildings such as a Basilica, thermal baths, an amphitheatre and a macellum (market).

Today there are still significant Roman remains scattered on both sides of the Appian Way.

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The Republican forum and the Roman theatre, built in the late Republican ear or at the beginning of the Empire, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The Republican forum and the Roman theatre, built in the late Republican era or at the beginning of the Empire.
The Roman theatre, built in the late Republican era or at the beginning of the Empire, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The Roman theatre, built in the late Republican era or at the beginning of the Empire.
The podium of the Temple of Augustus, built at the beginning of the Imperial age right alongside the Capitolium, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The podium of the Temple of Augustus, built at the beginning of the Imperial age right alongside the Capitolium.
The podium of the Temple of Augustus, built at the beginning of the Imperial age right alongside the Capitolium, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The Republican forum and the podium of the Temple of Augustus.
The ruins of the Capitolium (temple dedicated to the triad Jupiter, Juno and Minerva), an Etrusco-Italic type temple built ca. 191 BC, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The ruins of the Capitolium (temple dedicated to the triad Jupiter, Juno and Minerva), an Etrusco-Italic type temple built ca. 191 BC.
The reconstructed monumental colonnade along the Appian Way with the macellum behind, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The reconstructed monumental colonnade along the Appian Way with the macellum behind.
The macellum (market) and the tabernae dating to the Hadrianic period (117-138), Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The macellum (market) and the tabernae dating to the Hadrianic period (117-138 AD).
The macellum (market) and the tabernae dating to the Hadrianic period (117-138), Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The macellum (market) and the tabernae dating to the Hadrianic period (117-138 AD).
Black & white mosaic in the caldarium of the thermae depicting cupids pressing grapes, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
Black & white mosaic in the caldarium of the thermae depicting cupids pressing grapes.
The tepidarium, the warm bathroom of the baths complex heated by a hypocaust (underfloor heating system), Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The tepidarium, the warm bathroom of the baths complex heated by a hypocaust (underfloor heating system).
The ruins of the Hadrianic Basilica of the Imperial forum, Minturnae, Minturno, Italy
The ruins of the Hadrianic Basilica of the Imperial forum.
Aqueduct near Minturnae, built between the end of the Republic and the beginning of the Empire, Minturno, Italy
Aqueduct near Minturnae, built between the end of the Republic and the beginning of the Empire.

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